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Adega Regional de Colares - 2017 - Chão Rijo Tinto

Sale price€6,99

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Colares Chão Rijo Tinto is made with the native Castelão (80%) and Tinta Roriz (20%) grapes that were harvested at the beginning of October. They were immediately destemmed (80%) and crushed, followed by fermentation in closed stainless steel tanks with temperature control (26-28ºC) and careful pumping over. Aged for one year in exotic wood (50%) and used oak (50%) barrels. Bottled in April 2021.

Adega Regional de Colares - 2017 - Chão Rijo Tinto
Adega Regional de Colares - 2017 - Chão Rijo Tinto Sale price€6,99

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Adega Regional de Colares

The Adega Regional de Colares, a wine region in the Sintra hills west of Lisbon, boasts a unique viticulture and history shaped by its specific terroir. Their viticulture starts in the sand. Unlike most wine regions in Portugal, Colares sits on a bed of sand left behind by ancient seabeds. These sandy soils are highly draining, forcing the vines to struggle for water and nutrients. This stress translates to intensely concentrated grapes with bold flavors.

Colares stubbornly clings to its own—the red grape Ramisco and the white grape Malvasia de Colares. These resilient varieties thrive in harsh conditions and contribute to the region's distinct character. 

Due to the strong Atlantic winds, vines in Colares are traditionally trained low to the ground in a system called "en cordão" (cordon). This protects the grapes from wind damage and promotes even ripening.

The Adega Regional de Colares has a long and distinguished history. As early as the 13th century, the Portuguese court prized its wines. King D. Afonso IV even declared them exclusive to the royal table! 

The devastating phylloxera outbreak of the late 19th century hit Colares hard. Unlike most regions that grafted their vines onto American rootstocks immune to the pest, Colares struggled to find a compatible rootstock for its sandy soils, resulting in a significant decline in production.

In recent decades, there has been a renewed interest in Colares wines. Winemakers are experimenting with new techniques while staying true to traditional grape varieties and low-intervention methods.

The result? Adega Regional de Colares wines are known for their minerality, acidity, and complexity. The red Ramisco produces wines with intense aromas of red and black fruits, violets, and earth, with firm tannins that soften with age. The white Malvasia de Colares offers a refreshing bouquet of citrus, white flowers, and a touch of salinity with a crisp and mineral finish. These are not your average wines; they are a taste of history and a testament to the enduring spirit of Colares.